Identification

Author

Weinberg M, Waterman S, Lucas CA, Falcon VC, Morales PK, et al.

Title

The U.S. - Mexico border infectious disease surveillance project: Establishing bi-national border surveillance

Year

2003

Publication type

Article

Journal

Emerging Infectious Diseases

Created

2012-10-03 18:12:42+00:00

Modified

2016-07-25 16:15:23.584221+00:00

Details

Volume

9

Number

1

Access

Language

English

URL http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/9/1/02-0047_article.htm
DOI

10.3201/eid0901.020047

Accessed

2016-06-06

Extended information

Abstract

In 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
the Mexican Secretariat of Health, and border health officials began the development of the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project, a surveillance system for infectious diseases along the U.S.-Mexico border. During a 3-year period, a binational team implemented an active, sentinel surveillance system for hepatitis and febrile exanthems at 13 clinical sites. The network developed surveillance protocols, trained nine surveillance coordinators, established serologic testing at four Mexican border laboratories, and created agreements for data sharing and notification of selected diseases and outbreaks. BIDS facilitated investigations of dengue fever in Texas- Tamaulipas and measles in California–Baja California. BIDS demonstrates that a binational effort with local, state, and federal participation can create a regional surveillance system that crosses an international border. Reducing administrative, infrastructure, and political barriers to cross-border public health collaboration will enhance the effectiveness of disease prevention projects such as BIDS.