Diseases

Name

Larva migrans

Names alternate

Cutaneous larva migrans
CLM
Creeping eruption
Sandworms
Ground itch
Plumber's itch
Ocular larva migrans
Visceral larva migrans
Roundworm infection
Baylisascaris

Parents
(1) Dermatologic infection
Agents
(1) (Ancylostoma braziliense) > (Ancylostoma) > Nematodes (Nematoda) > Metazoa (Animalia)
(2) (Ancylostoma) > Nematodes (Nematoda) > Metazoa (Animalia)
Populations
(1) Cattle (Bos taurus) > Hoofed animal > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
(2) Domestic cat (Felis catus) > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
(3) Domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) > Canis > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
(4) Hoofed animal > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
(5) Human (Homo sapiens sapiens) > Primate > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
(6) Swine (Sus) > Hoofed animal > Placental mammal (Eutheria) > Mammal (Mammalia) > Vertebrate > Animal (Animalia)
Transmission
(1) Ingestion
Properties
(1) Zoonotic
Documents
(1) CFSPH: Larva Migrans (None)
(2) Wikipedia: Cutaneous larva migrans (2015)
Notes

These parasites live in the intestines of dogs, cats and wild animals and should not be confused with other members of the hookworm family for which humans are definitive hosts, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. Most animals with larva migrans show no signs of illness. Young animals may have diarrhea and possibly die if the number of worms present is large.

Created

2015-07-27 13:44:34+00:00

Modified

2015-09-08 16:06:44.970510+00:00